Virtual Flexo Plant

Inventory Management

Description

Since printers purchase many types of new and semi-finished materials, including inks, substrates, solvents and other items, it is important to keep proper records for good inventory management. Good recordkeeping will also help you track usage and the shelf life of materials. Not only should records be kept of materials purchased, but an inventory of items disposed of should be kept as well. These steps are important not only for the bottom line, but will help keep your shop in compliance with rules and regulations, while minimizing waste. Proper inventory management includes keeping and properly filing receipts, bills of lading, manifests, records of sewer discharge bills, etc.

Best Management Practices & Pollution Prevention

Materials having expired shelf life should not automatically be thrown out. Instead, this material should be tested for effectiveness. The material may be usable, rather than becoming a waste. Check on alternative uses before discarding.

Consider contacting a nearby high school or college graphic arts department to donate expired materials for its program.

Link up with a waste exchange in your area.

Purchase materials from a manufacturer that will accept material returns, if shelf life is exceeded.

To prevent input material contamination, the storage area should be kept clean and should not be open to traffic. Traffic will increase dust and dirt in the storage area, and can result in possible contamination. Use bollards, chains, floor markings or other means to protect materials from accidental damage by forklifts and other mechanical and pedestrian traffic.

Chemicals that are sensitive to light and temperature such as film processing chemistry should be stored according to the manufacturer’s directions to prevent damage to the materials. Chemical container labels generally list recommended storage conditions.

Make sure the original containers of products are completely empty before they are thrown away. Use the entire product; it makes good business sense.

So that employees are encouraged to use a non-hazardous material readily available to them within the facility, control access to hazardous materials so that they are not used in place of the non-hazardous alternative.

For access to vendors who may supply alternative materials and equipment, see the PNEAC Vendor Directory.

Environmental Regulations

OSHA regulations must be followed when transferring flammable or combustible liquids from one container to another.

The regulations require that the containers must be grounded when transferring flammable or combustible liquids between them. 29 CFR 1910.106(e)(6)(ii) , 29 CFR 1910.106(h)(7)(i)(b), and 29 CFR 1910.107(e)(9), indicate that when transferring flammable or combustible liquids, both containers must be effectively bonded and grounded to prevent the discharge of sparks of static electricity. This means that the fill stem is bonded to the container transfer/filling operations by means of a bond wire so that no difference of electrical potential exists between the two containers.

An OSHA standard interpretation dated 10/06/86 and titled Transfer of Class 1A Liquids from Polyethylene Drums further explains bonding and grounding requirements. OSHA Instruction STD 1-5.14A, dated 10/24/80, permits storage and use of flammable and combustible liquids in DOT-specification polyethylene containers. However, these containers are not equipped with a means for electrical grounding; therefore, one of the following conditions must be met:

Polyethylene drums must be equipped with an approved metallic pump and draw tube for taking liquid through the top of the drum, and the pump must be electrically grounded.

Drums or containers must have a metallic self-closing faucet that is electrically grounded.

Empty Containers

It is important that employees understand and comply with Department of Transportation (DOT) and U.S. EPA definitions of an empty container, because potential liability can be raised because containers thought to be empty, might be shipped which are not legally empty.

Department of Transportation (DOT): According to 49 CFR 173.29, an empty package meets one of the following conditions:

  • The packaging is unused
  • The packaging is sufficiently cleaned of residue and purged of vapors to remove any potential hazard
  • The packaging is refilled with a material that is not hazardous to such an extent that any residue remaining in the packaging no longer poses a hazard; or
  • The packaging contains residue of specifically allowable hazardous materials listed in 49 CFR 173.29(b)(iv)

An empty package must have all old markings, labels, and placards removed, obliterated, or securely covered in transportation. However, this does not apply to packaging in a transport vehicle or freight container if the packaging is not visible in transportation and the packaging is loaded by the shipper and unloaded by the shipper or consignee.

Any packaging that is not empty must be offered for transportation and transported in the same manner as when it previously contained a greater quantity of hazardous material. That is, the packaging must have all of the appropriate marks, labels, placards, accompanying shipping papers, and emergency response information.

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency: According to 40 CFR 261.7(b)(1) U.S. EPA considers a container empty only if as much has been removed as possible, and no more than one inch or 0.3% of the total capacity (by weight) remains. The Agency expects bottom valves to be used, when present, if they provide maximal removal of waste. 55-gallon drums should be emptied as completely as possible using pouring, pumping, aspirating, or other techniques. If pouring from an inverted drum removes more residual than a hand pump does, then pouring is obligatory.

Health & Safety

OSHA Regulations on Transfer of Flammable or Combustible Liquids from One Container to Another.

OSHA regulations requires that when transferring flammable or combustible liquids between containers the containers are required to be grounded in a specific way, to prevent the discharge of sparks of static electricity. Careful adherence to these methods will help prevent fires and/or explosions. 29 CFR 1910.106(e)(6)(ii) 1910.106(h)(7)(i)(b), and 29 CFR 1910.107(e)(9) indicate that when transferring flammable or combustible liquids, both containers must be effectively bonded and grounded. This means that the fill stem is bonded to the container transfer/filling operations by means of a bond wire so that no difference of electrical potential exists between the two containers.

An OSHA standard interpretation dated 10/06/86 and titled Transfer of Class 1A Liquids from Polyethylene Drums further explains bonding and grounding requirements. OSHA Instruction STD 1-5.14A, dated 10/24/80, permits storage and use of flammable and combustible liquids in DOT-specification polyethylene containers. Since these containers are not equipped with a means for electrical grounding one of the following conditions must be met:

  • Polyethylene drums must be equipped with an approved metallic pump and draw tube for taking liquid through the top of the drum, and the pump must be electrically grounded; or
  • Drums or containers must have a metallic self-closing faucet that is electrically grounded

Stacking Height Limits Must Be Met

OSHA limits the height materials may be stacked within in a building equipped with an overhead sprinkler system. According to 29 CFR 1910.159(c)(10), the minimum vertical clearance between sprinklers and material below is 18 inches (45.7 cm). State and local building and fire codes might be more stringent.

Additional Information